What is the difference between 220 volts, 3 phase and 380/220 volts, 3 phase (overseas applications)?

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What is the difference between 220 volts, 3 phase and 380/220 volts, 3 phase (overseas applications)?

220 volts, 3 phase

  1. If you have 220 volts and 3 phase power available, the kiln will come with a 3-wire powerblock for the 3 hot wires that give the 3 phase.
  2. Between each hot wire, 220 volts can be measured.
  3. There is no need for a neutral wire to come to the kiln in this case, just an earth ground wire in addition to the 3 hot wires.

380/220 volts, 3 phase

  1. If you have 380/220 volts and 3 phase power (like a lot of foreign countries), the kiln will come with a 4-wire powerblock for the 3 hot wires that give 3 phase and one neutral wire.
  2. Between each hot wire, 380 volts can be measured.
  3. Between the neutral and any of the hot wires, 220 volts can be measured.
  4. The kiln circuits are connected to the neutral line and one of the hot lines for each kiln section to provide 220 volts for each kiln section.
  5. In addition to the 3 hot wires and the neutral wire, an earth ground wire is needed as well.

Additional Actions to Take

  1. Check your voltage at the receptacle or at your fused disconnect box. Check voltage at your panel and where the kiln is connected. Check the voltage when the kiln is firing and when it is not firing.
  2. Make sure no other large electrical appliances such as a clothes dryer or electric oven are on when you are operating your kiln.
  3. Find out from your local utility company when the end of the peak period of electrical use is.
  4. Check to see what the wire size of your circuit is. If it is very far (more than 50 feet) from your main circuit box then the wire size might need to be higher.